The Age-Old Question “How Do Pharmaceutical Drugs Get in Drinking Water” is Really Nothing New

The fact that drugs get in our drinking water is so alarming. It makes things like toxins in water seem like old threats. But today, water supplies across the country have trace element of drugs. This discovery is causing experts and ordinary citizens to ask the question: how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?

When a probe finds drugs in drinking water, it sets off all kinds of bells and whistles. The first area of concern for most people is how the drugs end up in their drinking water. The next thing people need to realize is that not all of the drugs they take stay in their bodies. When drugs are ingested or injected into our body, we do not necessarily use all of the drugs. These excess drugs get flushed out in urine and feces.

Some say this is a good thing since pharmaceuticals can overpower your system. On the other hand, it’s not welcome news for the ecosystem. These drug elements find their way into our streams, rivers and other water systems, as well as into our municipal water treatment facilities.

As you might know, addressing the quality of tap water is nothing new. But the newest threat of drugs in our waterways is just one more to add to our already tainted water. But simply asking “how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water” is not enough. The more urgent problem lies in the fact that such drugs are not easily filtered out of our drinking water.

When a scientific probe finds drugs in drinking water, it usually reveals what levels and what type of drugs. A study by the Associate Press, for example, found low levels of drugs from over-the-counter medications to highly potent narcotics. Still some say that even in small doses, the pharmaceuticals are toxic to the body. The main reason for this is the fact the people might be ingesting them over a continuous period of time.

No one knows just yet what this long-term exposure will do. The problem of drugs in water is growing rapidly worldwide. In the Unite States alone, traces of drugs are found in most sources of drinking water.

How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water supplies? Review the following to brush up on the different types of water sources and their safety:

Underground aquifers supply around 40 percent of the drinking water in the United States. Sadly, drugs can seep into aquifers even in rural areas.

Well-water is not controlled by public water treatment facilities. People dig wells and have the misguided faith that this is a totally safe way to collect healthy drug-free water.

By and large, bottled water suppliers do not test water for the presence of drugs.

Lastly, don’t be fooled by some water purification devices and companies. Some ineffective home filtration systems do not filter out all the harmful chemicals and drugs in water and can also become contaminated with drug by-products. Click on my bio and find out the home filtration systems that do.

How Do Pharmaceutical Drugs Get in Drinking Water?

First of all, it’s a fact: many prescription drugs, plus over-the-counter drugs, have been found in public water supplies serving millions, virtually all over the United States and Europe.

The New York Times and the Associated Press have both reported on these findings in recent months, with widely printed, broadcast and webcast stories carrying headlines like, “Probe finds drugs in drinking water.”

Part of the problem is hospitals, pharmacies, clinics and doctor’s offices washing out-of-date or unwanted drugs down drains. Leaky septic tanks are another suggested source. Some 40 percent of antibiotics manufactured in America are fed to livestock as a growth stimulant, and manure from these animals is another likely source of drugs in drinking water. A small part may come from manufacturing plants, but these are the only potential sources that are carefully monitored.

Finally, you and I are a major cause of the problem.

Pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water when people on medication go to the toilet: they excrete drugs not fully absorbed by the body, plus metabolized byproducts. Also, many people dispose of unwanted drugs by flushing them down the toilet.

Water companies treat the waste before discharging it into rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and then treat it again before it enters our drinking water supplies. But our water treatment plants were never designed to remove drugs from our drinking water; they are designed to get rid of disease germs, odors, and long-known hazards like lead and PCBs. Not surprisingly, these water treatments don’t remove all traces of drugs.

Amount of drugs is small, but is it safe?

The amount of pharmaceutical drugs in drinking water is nearly always very small, usually measured in parts per billion. But many different drugs have been found in public water supplies, in endless combinations. And we drink the water year after year. No one really knows whether it’s safe to do so.

“We recognize it is a growing concern and we’re taking it very seriously.”
said Benjamin H. Grumbles, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assistant administrator for water.

What are these drugs?

Here are a few:

Anti-epileptic drugs and tranquilizers found in Southern California; a sex hormone in San Francisco; antibiotics and other medications in Tucson, Arizona; pharmaceutical drugs for pain, infection, cholesterol control, asthma and heart conditions in Philadelphia; carbamazepine, a mood stabilizer, and a metabolized byproduct of angina medication in Northern New Jersey.

It’s not just public water systems that suffer from drugs in drinking water. Pharmaceutical drugs have been found in private wells, too. Bottled water is also affected. Bottlers do not test or treat for pharmaceuticals, and 40 percent of bottled water is just repackage tap water.

The good news: You can take practical, cost-effective action

Here are some reasonable things you can do:

1. Avoid bottled water. At a cost ranging from just under a dollar up to $10 a gallon, it’s the world’s most expensive answer to pharmaceutical drugs found in drinking water. More than 80 percent of the bottles end up in landfills; chemicals leach from the plastic bottle into the water and may affect our health; and the petroleum used would fuel about 100,000 cars each year. Even then, it’s not a solution: nearly half is just bottled tap water, as noted above.

2. Don’t flush unneeded drugs down the toilet. If possible, treat them as you would unused paint or household chemicals and turn them into a local center to be disposed of, often by incineration. At worst, wrap them up and put them in the garbage.

3. Don’t use deodorants or other personal care items containing the antibiotic triclosan.

4. Consider organic meats, raised without a diet of antibiotics.

5. Consider a quality home water filter, then bottle your own water if you wish. Use a glass container or one of a few water bottles on the market that aren’t plastic.

Pharmacy Technician Test For Your Competency Evaluation

The Pharmacy Technician Test has been prepared to assess the competency evaluation of a Pharmacy Technician. The test also evaluates the working quality of a Pharmacy Technician in actual working in pharmacy settings. Certification is awarded to the passing candidate. But, why Pharmacy test and Certification are essential for a Pharmacy personnel and how they will be benefited by earning the certification?

In order to answer these questions, it is necessary to gain knowledge about Pharmacy Technicians. Pharmacy professionals are well trained in pharmacy field and they assist the Pharmacist by performing various pharmacy related works. It is their duty to help pharmacist in preparation of prescription, provide medications to customers and patients alike, counsel customers about use and misuse of the drugs, inform them about the effects of different types of drugs on the body, look after the cash counter, do administrative duties and perform numerous other pharmacy and drug related works in a pharmacy.

Though no formal education is required for working in a Pharmacy and work-on-the job training is enough for getting employment in a pharmacy. But, obtaining a Certification offers various types of benefits, such as better career prospects, higher salary and wider knowledge of medication field.

The Certification is offered by the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board and it is necessary to pass the PTCB Certification test for earning certification. There are many community colleges, schools, trade schools and online courses, which prepares a student for the test.

PTCB certification test consist of 125 multiple choice scoring questions and 15 non-scoring questions. The non-scoring questions do not score but, they are helpful in future tests and quality test. The duration of the exam is 3 hours and the person appearing for the test must answer all questions, within that stipulated time period. Scores are offered according to the answered questions. Thus, it is necessary for a student to answer all questions to score better. Every question has 4 answers option, where only one answer is correct and that has to be marked by the individual appearing for the exam.

If you are also looking for the better career prospect, then you must sit for the Certification test and earn certification, which can also help you in getting registered with respective State Board of Pharmacy.